Bad Ass Producer: Lindsey Moringy of “The Do Over”

Lindsey Moringy, She puts the "pro" in producer

Lindsey Moringy is #purehustle.  From producing sold out festivals (BettyFest) to packaging sold out show runs, (there’s also that little music festival she produces, too), she’s a powerhouse of strategy and execution. Also: She’s really funny. As The Do Over wraps up its run, we asked her to school us on how she approaches being a producer and to see why she’s just so dang good. 

Tell us about your background in performing and producing.

Lindsey Moringy, She puts the "pro" in producer

Lindsey Moringy, She puts the “pro” in producer

I’m a graduate of ColdTowne’s Conservatory, and am currently taking more improv classes at The New Movement. I also am one of the producers of BettyFest, an annual comedy festival that celebrates women performers. By day you can find me doing digital marketing for some of your favorite music festivals. By night you can find me performing with:

  • The Do Over (every Saturday in January, 8:30pm at ColdTowne!)
  • SheSheSheShe (see us 2/28 at ColdTowne  in SHE! True Hollywood Story!)
  • Stool Pigeon (see us at ColdTowne every Sunday at 8:30pm!)
  • Baby Bob Saget (lol we play wherever people want to see us)

I WILL NEVER NOT USE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR SHOW PROMOTION AND YOU SHOULDN’T EITHER, READER FRIEND!

How did you get started?

I started taking improv classes to have an excuse to turn off my brain and force myself to have fun once a week, and I really fell in love with Austin comedy and the people who do it. I basically realized I had no hobbies, and that I was letting work stress me out all the time. I told myself that I wouldn’t join any troupes (tbh I was scared no one would want me), but then during Level 2 at ColdTowne I was asked to be in SheSheSheShe with my main babes Megan Mowry, Laura de la Fuente, Linzy Beltran, Stephanie Ard, and Jessica Vasami. I’m SO grateful they asked me to join and that they have constantly supported me ever since. Now I know so many incredible fellow improvisers who allow me to be a big ol’ dummy in front of random strangers and sweet friends on a regular basis, and that’s strangely empowering.

Tell us about the show. How did you come up with the concept?

The Do Over (FREE Deep Eddy Vodka – THIS Saturday at 8:30pm!!) is really the brainchild of a group of people, not just me. It’s also an Adam Sandler movie available on Netflix, but we didn’t know that was coming out when we first titled the show – luckily, I’d say we won that battle. My two boyfriends, Linzy Beltran (comedy boyfriend) and Aaron Walther (real life boyfriend) helped me refine the idea and build the cast.

You see, I’m a bigtime worrier. I have had a lot of moments in my life that I wish I could do over: the passive/shy way I’ve reacted to sexist remarks, not applying for out-of-state colleges,  not eating breakfast this morning, etc. I figured other people must have similar thoughts, and that it would be fun to build a show that focuses on what your life MIGHT have been like had you made the other decision, if you had one do over. Viewing yourself in an alternate reality can be fun and also terrifying, but always entertaining.

I pitched the idea to Will Cleveland who at the time did not know me. He agreed to direct the show, and I’m so glad he did – it wouldn’t be the same without him. He helped guide the cast into creating the form that the show ultimately took. He keeps us grounded and relatable. Emoji prayer hands.

What is your approach to producing? What’s a definite do and don’t?

My main secret is that I always bring La Croix to rehearsals. No one will ever be dehydrated on my watch!

DO: Trust the people you pull into your show to do a good job with it.

DONT: Get so trapped in your own head about producing a show that you forget to have fun when you’re performing. Also, don’t be stubborn about your idea because it’s going to morph with other people’s input and turn into something even better than you could have ever imagined.

Complete this sentence “a good producer is _______ and ________.”

Receptive and Creative.

What’s next for you? Are you particularly excited about any upcoming projects?

Ronnita Miller and Xaria Coleman of Damn Gina perform

Ronnita Miller and Xaria Coleman of Damn Gina perform at BettyFest, 2016

I’m going to be working on BettyFest (follow us on Facebook and Instagram @bettyfestatx!) and performing as much as I can, because at the end of the day that’s why I’m here. Not to force show promotion on you 24/7, but to have fun with my frahnds. Oh, and I’m def going to catch Damn Gina’s show Night Watch when they take over the main stage slot at 8:30pm every Saturday in February – they are unstoppable.

Don’t miss the final weekend of The Do Over, this Saturday (1/28) at 8:30pm.

Teacher Spotlight: Nathan Sowell

ColdTowne faculty and performer, Nathan Sowell.

Winner of “Best Coach” in 2016, Nathan Sowell is the complete package. Knowledgeable and encouraging as a teacher and joyful as a performer, he is a critic, audience and student favorite. We posed a couple of questions about his background and philosophy in this post.

Nathan Sowell, ColdTowne Teacher and Performer

Nathan Sowell, ColdTowne Teacher and Performer

Tell us about your background, Nathan.

I started taking improv classes in Chicago at Columbia College from a very nice man, Brian Posen. He encouraged me to continue pursuing the craft which led me to iO Chicago. There I fell in love with the art formby watching Cook County Social Club, The Reckoning, and Carl and the Passions religiously. At the time, I was taught and coached by The Improvised Shakespeare Company’s Andy Carey to whom I credit a large amount of my improv foundation. I played the occasional show with my indie team Boom Boom Washington at different indie theaters in town like Chemically Imbalanced Comedy, The Cornservatory, and The Playground.  I grew to miss Texas and its mild winters, which led me to pack up all of my stuff and move to Austin with two good friends. Within my first two weeks in town, I answered an audition notice on the AIC Forum for a ColdTowne troupe that was looking for new members, Nice Astronaut. They graciously opened their arms to me, and introduced me to ColdTowne. It was love at first sight. Over the next two years, I was able to attain something that felt missing in Chicago, reps. I was given the opportunity to hone my craft and love for improvisation, and over the last couple of years that has blossomed into not only performing but coaching and teaching some truly amazing individuals at our theater.

You won “Outstanding Coach” this year. What is your approach to coaching improv troupes?

When I begin working with a new troupe, I always start with a session that focuses on what I consider to be the fundamentals of scenework: creating and exploring your relationship with the other individual you are performing with. I strongly believe that great improv is borne out of a willingness to trust your and your scene partners natural reactions, and embrace the fear of the unknown together. With this in mind, I craft warm ups and exercises that work specific performance muscles during the coaching session. The stronger we get those muscles, the more we can rely on our instincts, as opposed to our brains, when we are up in front of an audience.

How do you approach teaching improv to brand new students when you lead the Improv 101 classes?

The same way I approach coaching and teaching normally, but with a focus on the aspects of improv that I have grown to cherish. We run exercises that focus on putting yourself out there in a room full of strangers, supporting the first offer made with haste and enthusiasm, and appreciating the unlimited potential for unique scenework that comes with collaborating with individuals from all backgrounds. In fact, that last one is something I try to instill in all of the young improvisers I come into contact with. As humans, we have the tendency to form cliques with others most like ourselves. Improv encourages, and is elevated by those of completely different backgrounds, race, age, gender identification, sexual orientation coming together and creating a group mind that can only and will only exist with that particular amalgamation of individuals. Through improvising and learning improv, we get to discover what we have in common with each other, and how different our perspectives are.

How do you feel like the Coldtowne philosophy intersects with your own approach to teaching and performing?

What really stood out to me, when I first started classes at ColdTowne, was the rich talent that was teaching. The faculty was comprised of improvisers with such varied backgrounds and philosophies. Nothing taught was ever treated as though it was sacred. We were made very well aware of the fact that the only right answer was the one that worked best for you. This allowed me to craft my own voice through the voices of my teachers. I may not have agreed with everything one particular instructor taught, but I wasn’t meant to. They provided me with the answers they had found on their journey, and I try to do the same for my students. At the end of the day, it will be up to them to decide which tools work best for themselves.

What else are you up to these days?

Along with teaching at ColdTowne, I also work for Vigilante Bar, a new board gaming bar and restaurant that is opening up right across the street from ColdTowne Conservatory. I am also in the process of creating a multitude of workshops that focus and hone some of my favorite improv skills. My ObjectWorkout workshop on Object Work will be a monthly elective open to everyone in the Austin Improv Community. You can catch me playing every Saturday in February at 7:00pm with Missed Connections ATX, and with Nice Astronaut on the second Saturday of every month at 11:30pm.

Nathan teaches our introductory Improv 101 class, every other Monday at 7pm.

Don’t Look Back: A retrospective on ’16 and look ahead w/Dave Buckman

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Now that we’ve closed the books on 2016, we sidled up to Executive Producer Dave Buckman to
talk about his first full year of programming at ColdTowne Theater to see what shows and performers had a break out run or year. 

What mainstage shows from 2016 were your favorites?
Dave: Dinner for Six, famiLIES, Elvis’ Rockin’ Nativity, Express Yourself

February - March 2016 Cast, Express Yourself

February – March 2016 Cast, Express Yourself

Were there specific performers that emerged in 2016 through the main stage runs? What makes them notable to you?

Dave: Jae Long in famiLIES… It was his first time ever doing a play and he just crushed it and carried it.  I wish we could do it this season because now that Jae has transitioned, that lead character of Francis would be amazing and so much more poignant and timely if she was playing Francis now.

Chaz Formichella in famiLIES.  This was a character Chaz had played before in the previous incarnation in 2010, and it could have been such a throwaway part in the way it was re-written, but his turn, this time, as Simon was revelatory.  He brought more depth to that role than I thought was possible, and every line he delivered perfect every night because he was listening while he was acting.

Jared Robertson, Michael Perkins and Chris McKeever in Elvis’ Rockin’ Nativity.  They play the backup band for every number playing actual tunes well, sometimes having to do it in a different key than the original or a slower tempo depending on the person singing and they also portray the Beatles and the Sex Pistols in some sketches.  A complete multi-talented power trio-delight that literally drives the show.

Sanjay Rao of Empty Promises, Midnight Society

Sanjay Rao of Empty Promises, Midnight Society

Also, Molly Moore, Kenah Benefield, Tauri Laws-Phillips, Megan Mowry, Abby Lincoln, Sanjay Rao and Will Sitters all really leveled up and, I think, found and developed the shit out of their comedic voices this year in various mainstage shows.

What show surprised you the most and why?

Dave: Express Yourself was explosive and caustic and compelling and moving.  All done with basically a Living Room format. It was exciting to see Frank Netscher and Ryan Darbonne take a simple concept that we all felt ‘meh’ about (‘An Improvised Dangerous Minds’) and subvert the genre and turn it to something deeper and beyond all of our expectations.

If you could bring back one show, which would it be?

Dave: Dinner For Six.  Which we will.

Or famiLIES….with a transitioned Jae Long

Looking ahead to 2017 and the season that has been decided for the first half of the year, what are you most excited about?  Why did you decide on these particular shows?

The Do Over and Nightwatch are proven hits.  They’ve been developing their formats in other The Do Over timeslots all during last year and are really going strong in rehearsals right now.  I’ve been to a few rehearsals and they are getting stronger and more confident with their vision.  I think adding Erica Lies as NightWatch’s director was an amazing call.

Kristin Henn’s production of Rezurangur meshes so many of my favorite genres of comedy and theater: mockumentaries, heavy metal, actual live music, and my favrote kinds of characters: over the top showbiz characters mixed with real humans behind the curtain (see: Krusty the Klown or Spinal Tap)  And the cast and live band of improvisers Kristen and Cody have assembled… it’s gonna be a doozy.

Missed Connections ATX was developed out of a short form improv game the Austin Translation cast invented in 2015. Chelsea Bunn, from that cast who hosted and developed the game wtthin that show has developed it into an hour long format.  The herat of the pitch is to  pull Missed Connection listings off of Austin’s CraigList and having them inspire the scene work, characters and relationships of a show.

And then down the road, Cortnie Jones is developing a reality show game show called The Gauntlet for May and June that is like an 8-week competition to whittle 32 improvisers down to a grand champion. I can’t wait for those finals.

If you could sum up the 2017 season in 4 words or less, thematically, how would you describe it?

Dave: Individual vs. The Collective.  Which I think is the great philosophical and political debate of our time.

Which directors and producers are you especially excited to see in the 2017 season?

Dave: Certainly, the return of our previous Artistic Director, Cody Dearing, in his first directorial show, Rezurangur, since stepping down early last year is a big deal. He has put up some of the most memorable shows in ColdTowne history and he’s not only a great guitar shredder in his own right, he’s quite possibly the best improviser/game finder/relationship builder in Austin improv, so I think that’s show is a perfect fit for him.

The co-directing combo of Mical Trejo (Latino Comedy Project) and Ben Bazan (Longtime CTer and outstanding Actor for Youth at Zach) with an all-Latina/o cast in outer space for La Frontera Final is going to bring in some amazing new theatrical perspectives that will be new for ColdTowne

Keith Horvath, who just moved down here from Chicago last summer where he was working at The Second City and The Annoyance Theater, my old haunts.  We speak the same sketch language and it’s exciting to get to share that voice with Austin.  His show, This Is (Not) The Gayest Show You’ve Seen is already in previews and if his Halloween show was any indication, this one is going to ba amazing.

Also, the announcement of any show as being “from the minds of McNichol & May” is always terribly exciting news.  

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Dave Buckman, Executive Producer

Thanks, Dave.

Dave Buckman was a director, performer and teacher for Amesterdam’s Boom Chicago (1999-2002), The Second City (2002-2014) and ColdTowne Theater (2006-present). Dave has worked in live sketch and improvisational productions with the likes of Seth Meyers, Ike Barinholtz, Jordan Peele, John Lutz, Kay Cannon, Dave Razowsky, Rebecca Drysdale, Mick Napier, Maribeth Monroe, Stephnie Weir and Jason Sudeikis and dozens more whose faces you know but don’t know by name.  

Since 2005, Dave has been living in Austin, TX with wife and creative partner Rachel Madorsky, teaching and performing with their award-winning troupe The Frank Mills and helping to establish Coldtowne theater as a hotbed for Austin’s alternative comedy scene.  
Dave has won two B. Iden Payne Awards for Excellence in Improvisational Theater, one with The Frank Mills in 2006 and one individually in 2008 and is proud to be a member of the B. Iden Payne committee in 2015-16. He is currently the Executive Producer and co-owner of ColdTowne Theater.

 

How do you call your Loverboy? On Friday nights, starting Jan 2017.

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After Wednesday favorites Patio Talk moved to NYC to further their comedy careers in 2014, audiences wondered: who will move into the Wednesday night slot? Who could deliver that much energy, talent and delight week after week? Given the long shadow and packed houses that Patio Talk had built over the course of their residency, the expectations were sky high.

Enter Loverboy, a troupe of six graduates from ColdTowne (Cené Hale, Kim Lowery, Maria Pond, Chelsea Bunn, Stephanie Thoreson and Taylor Stewart). Deftly taking the baton from Patio Talk, they’ve proven their mettle week after week, with hilarious shows centered around the dating stories of a guest monologist. Beginning in January 2017, they will move to Friday nights at 8:30pm, taking over from the beloved and critically acclaimed Bad Boys.

We chatted Loverboy up over the internets about their origin story (hint: there was no nuclear accident), favorite show moments and what comes next.

How did Loverboy form?

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Original cast of Loverboy (from left Cené, Kim, Stephanie, Taylor, Maria and Chelsea)

I formed Loverboy because nobody had asked me to be in a troupe yet and the people had had the most fun with in class just happened to be ladies! – TS

I’m actually not an original member. I had been asked by Taylor if I was interested in being in a troupe that she was forming but I was so green and shy and intimidated, I didn’t even get back to her at the time. Then I sat in with them on maybe their second or third show and afterwards all I could think was, “Please ask me to join, please ask me to join, please ask me to join”, and luckily, they did. It was love at first show for me. -ST

Where is the name from?

I came up with the name Loverboy because it seemed to fit in with our format (dating and relationship stories) and I liked the nod to the 80s Canadian rock band. I think both groups are lovably dorky but still really fun and good at what they do! – TS

How did you come up with your form? How would you describe it?

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Loverboy performs at Out of Bounds in the State Theater, 2016.

The format is our variation on “The Armando.” We discovered through rehearsals that we like a rapid-fire pace and we’ve tried to play to that strength. Our format starts with short “vignettes” after each story, then we revisit the scenes/ideas that we liked the most, and end our show with a fast-paced, no-holds-barred run-out. -CB

I wanted the hook of hearing a different monologist’s story every week. It brings a new energy to every single show, which keeps things fresh for us and for the audience. We refined our version of The Armando over time. Several quick, unrelated 3-5 line scenes, followed by longer scenes and a second story. The last half of the show takes inspiration from the new story as well as everything that has happened since the show began, increasing the speed and blending worlds, revisiting characters, playing those games hard and looking for that killer “blackout joke”. – TS

What are some memorable show moments?

People have shared some amazing stories with us. One of my favorites was a guy who was asked to impregnate his date– it was their first date. He escaped by crawling out of the restaurant’s bathroom window. It was just like a sitcom! I’ve also enjoyed learning more about ethical polyamory, pansexuality, asexuality and other lifestyles. Love is love! -CB

We’ve had the full spectrum of memorable stories, from touching, to heartbreaking, to oh-my-god-I-can’t-breathe-because-I’m-laughing-so-hard. My favorite was when our long-time teacher and ColdTowne Theater co-owner Dave Buckman told stories from his time at BOOM Chicago in Amsterdam for our 4/20 performance. In Amsterdam he directed some now-famous comedians like Seth Meyers and Jordan Peele and he showed the audience a slideshow of photos from that time. It’s extra special now because orginal Loverboy cast member Cene Hale is now performing with BOOM Chicago. Full circle! – TS

My most memorable Loverboy moments usually happen before the show. Like when we had a sing off which ended in Cené down on one knee proposing to Maria, or the first time we performed together, we promised we wouldn’t let anyone “cook” onstage. I didn’t know what that meant in improv terms, and I thought, “Oh cool, yeah. Cause we’re women… so we don’t want to do a bunch of stereotypical cooking scenes…..” They corrected me. – KL

Many of my favorite show memories are more visceral, like the memory of the way a moment on stage made me feel as opposed to the actual specifics of said moment. For example, there was this one time Taylor and I came out on stage together and it was clear neither of us had an initiation so we just mirrored each other acting like wrestlers and found the game organically, together.  I can’t remember what in the world the scene evolved into, but I remember feeling so connected to her. I was buzzing. Because when you’re really in the moment with someone(s) and it’s working, it feels like magic. -ST

It’s hard to think of one moment, but I enjoy most when we make each other laugh. – MP

If you could have one local celebrity as a monologist, who would it be?

Wendy Davis. -CB

Elijah Wood, but I want the DJ version. – TS

Wendy Davis. (Amy Poehler would be my ultimate choice if we expand beyond local, and I hear she likes Austin!) – KL

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Loverboy with monologist Kyle Houston Moore.

Joss Whedon! “Shocking.” – said no one ever. -ST

Is it cliché to say Matthew McConaughey? – MP

You guys have this incredible playful energy. Where do you think that comes from?

We’re friends IRL and I think that plays into it a lot. Also, we know how to make each other laugh and we don’t hold back! -CB

Yes, we’re definitely real life BFFs! To get us going, we start our pre-show warm ups with a high energy check in, and we try to keep that up throughout the show. Truth be told, sometimes those warm ups are even more special to me than the show itself!  – KL

Our sincere love for each other. And yes, we work hard to check in with one another. – MP

Tell us about the tattoos.

Some of us had been considering a Loverboy tattoo for a while, and when we were in NYC for the Del Close Marathon, Stephanie drew up a concept that represents what we chant each week before our shows, “Less Fear, More Love”.  This sincerely stands for what I’ve learned from working with these women, and it has changed my life in incredible ways. – KL

I took this workshop with the amazing Rachel Madorsky called “Let the Love In” and the underlying theme boiled down to less fear, more love (also that improv will certainly make you cry and feel feelings and examine your existential thoughts on existence and humanism, like a lot, but anyways, haha).This idea really struck a chord with me. It was such a succinct way to think about being in the moment on stage with yourself and other people that you care for and trust. It’s also just a great way to think about being, like in the world, period.  Eventually it became our mantra. Less fear! More love! -ST

Give us a sneak peek of Fridays in 2017. What should an audience expect? Why would they come?

Our fast-paced improv show will continue to be inspired by your love stories, but expect to see some changes to our programming (and lineup) in the next year… -CB

There’s obviously no replacing Cene. But, who is replacing Cene?

We agree that Cene is irreplaceable, which is why we aren’t replacing her. If and when we add new member(s), they will be asked based on their skills and talents. -CB

Psh, she’s easily replaced. I mean all we gotta do is find somebody who is as amazing, talented, funny, smart, kind, caring, sings like an angel….wait…hold on, I’m crying… – TS

Wait, Cené is just on vacation right. She’s coming back right?!? -KL

I’ll be the one in the corner, weeping. Please excuse. -ST

I don’t get it. Cené said she was going to the store to grab milk. – MP

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It’s a tongue, duh.

Your logo: Is it a tongue or a wang?

NOT A WANG!!! We worked with a female artist who helped us establish our logo/brand. We were drawn to lips because they are playful, feminine, and play to the fact that people are telling stories. Plus they’re sexy. (There, I said it.) -CB

I sort of love that people think it’s a wang. I never saw it that way until someone was asked to take our poster down at work because it was inappropriate. – KL

Ew. – MP

 

What troupes or players are coming up that you are fans of?

Lady Parts, for sure. I’ve also really enjoyed the QueerTowne jam– lots of talent within that community! I think I speak for all of us when I say that we adore Kenah Benefield, who is a wonderful performer AND we are #blessed to have him running our tech every week. KENAH IF YOU’RE READING THIS, NEVER LEAVE US! -CB

Basketball Dog is so dang funny. – TS

Lady Parts on and off stage all the way! I’m a huge fan of Will Dwyer’s and Michael Perkins’ writing and improv, and even though they’re not exactly “coming up”, I’m a nut for Damn Gina.-KL

Yes! Agreed on all accounts! We’re gonna need a deeper bench! -ST  

You Gave Me a Mountain (of a Show): An interview with Elvis’s director Will Cleveland

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Will Cleveland is the Artistic Director of ColdTowne Theater, and has performed, produced and directed shows at the theater since moving to Austin from NYC in 2013. Prior to coming to ColdTowne, he managed UCB’s traveling team and was a producer for UCBComedy. He is a native of Arkansas and you can see him in Play by Play with Chris McKeever every month at ColdTowne.

Tell us about the show.

Elvis’ Rockin’ Nativity is a throwback variety show from TV shows like The Johnny Cash Show, The Dean Martin Show, Sonny & Cher, and The Smothers Brothers. It’s final conception asks what if Elvis had a Christmas Variety Television Special and things didn’t really go as planned. Elvis is the host of the show and his friends play different roles in the Nativity Christmas Pageant like Johnny Cash and June Carter who play Joseph and the Virgin Mary.

What inspired you when creating this show?

I grew up watching reruns of the Smothers Brothers, Sonny and Cher, and sketch shows like Laugh-In, and Carol Burnett. Also, I’ve always been a big Elvis fan. I wrote and directed a version of this show in 2012 at Upright Citizens Brigade Theater East in New York. I was on a video production team for UCBComedy and wrote it as a commercial parody first, but couldn’t really see us producing it as a short video, so I pitched it to the theatre as a full show. So, we put up a 25 minute version that was a lot of fun, but one night only, so it really left me wanting more.

Kim Lowery plays Elvis, and there are several other male characters played by females. Tell us about the thought process behind that casting decision.

Kim Lowery as Elvis.

Kim Lowery as Elvis.

Yeah! When I was in high school, I found a “lost” episode of Seinfeld online, and directed it as my senior project for theatre class. Jerry, Elaine, and George were no-brainers, but nobody in my class could play Kramer. Except Rachel Harding. She was taller than anybody and she was really funny. And then, of course, she crushed the role. After that, I never really questioned casting roles based on gender – especially for comedy. When casting Elvis for this show, I thought about some awesome dudes to play Elvis, but something was holding me back from asking or even holding auditions. I went to see a play at Vortex in the summer and Kim was there too. After the play, we were having drinks in the courtyard, and it just kind of hit me. I think it was something about Kim’s rock and roll style and her very open mind, but I thought she should play Elvis, so I just asked her right then and there. Once we started our writers meetings, all bets were off and every role that was written was on the table for anybody to play.

If someone isn’t familiar with Elvis, will they still enjoy the show?

No doubt about it. We have a short film intro to Elvis and who he was at the top of the show. And, even though it’s set in 1970-something, the sketches are very contemporary and satirical to issues we’re still talking about today. There’s something for everybody in this show.

Why Elvis?

There’s so much to explore with Elvis – Rock Star, Movie Star, Soldier, Karate Master, Spiritualist, “Government Agent”…all these things are ripe for parody. but Elvis is already such a big, larger than life character – almost a myth, like John Wayne, Teddy Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart. Of all the things Elvis accomplished in his career, he never made a Christmas movie or TV show. He made some Christmas albums, but of the 31 movies he starred in, there wasn’t a Christmas Movie or TV special, so it was just kind of up for grabs so to speak.

What else should we know about the show?

It’s about 70 minutes long. BYOB if you’re into that. We have a very merry atmosphere in the lobby before and after the show.

Elvis’s Rockin’ Nativity runs through December 17th, Saturdays at 8:30pm. Tickets are $10 advance and $12 at the door, with advance tickets strongly recommended due to the popularity of the show.  Pick up your tickets here, darlin’.