Missed Connections ATX: Mining Local Personal Ads for Comedy Gold

Have you pondered the existence of love at first sight? Are you hoping to meet-cute the partner of your dreams? Do you still consider yourself a hopeless romantic in an age of dating apps and matchmaking sites? If your answer to any of these questions is remotely close to “maybe,” then Missed Connections ATX opening February 3rd at ColdTowne is a must-see.

Back following a sold-out run of shows in 2017 (including during Out of Bounds Comedy Festival), the show features Austin improvisors Nathan Sowell, Ronnita Miller (Damn Gina), Sanjay Rao (Midnight Society), Shane Gannaway, Kelly Campbell, and Tyler Groce. The fully improvised show also adds the talents of Allison Webber, Katie Stone (Naughty Bits), Frank Sanchez, and Dave Buckman (The Frank Mills) to the cast.

While the show itself is entirely improvised, the cast draws inspiration from missed connections ads posted on the websiteCraigslist.com. “Missed Connections ATX takes the lost opportunities of fellow Austinites and allows us to have fun with the looming conclusion that we’ll all be alone forever,” said veteran cast member, Tyler Groce.

The audience will hear personal ads read aloud for the first time along with the cast, adding an exciting element of discovery. “You very much see Austin keeping it weird,” cast member Kelly Campbell said in regard to the ads used in last year’s shows and in rehearsal.

From the Puritanically tame to lewd, crude, and naughty, Missed Connections ATX is guaranteed to feature pieces that run the gamut of lovesick, anonymous personal ads. “When you get an ad that starts off with ‘man for woman at junkyard,’ that’s when you know you’ve struck gold!” Groce said.

“The show is, in a way, its own lovingly crafted ad to the city of its inspiration,” said cast member Shane Ganaway. “Audiences will delight in the uniquely Austin voice a lot of these missed connections carry.”

The show lovingly pokes fun at the lengths we’ll go to find love or affection without being cruel or disparaging toward the post authors. “We take these missed connections as an opportunity to connect,” explained Groce. He went on to add that, of course, “we have a little fun along the way.”

Opening February 3rd at 8:30pm, the show runs every Saturday through March 24th, with a special Valentine’s Day show on Wednesday, February 14th. Filled with music and mayhem, Missed Connections ATX is a not a show you want to ghost. And if last year’s run is any indication, buy your tickets ahead of time before they sell out. Who knows? You just might make your own missed connection at Missed Connections ATX.

Get tickets in advance: bit.ly/2n5K9Bt

Know Your Troupe: Patio Talk

Thursdays in June, PATIO TALK presents BettyFest featuring an all female lineup of talented performers. Each week will showcase a different opening improv troupe and will be hosted by one of Austin’s finest stand up comedians. The first three shows sold out early so be sure to pick up your tickets for the final show on Thursday, June 26. In this edition of Know Your Troupe we sit down with Kasey Borger, Juliet Prather, Chrissy Shackelford, and Amy Wright of Patio Talk. Formed in the winter of 2013, Patio Talk mixes character and relationship work with high energy fast play.

How did you get your start in improv?

Chrissy Shackelford

Chrissy Shackelford

Chrissy: I’ve been performing improv for a little over two years now. I started during my senior year of college on a whim when I decided to take an improv/sketch intensive at The Second City Chicago. I was sitting at Mozart’s coffee shop studying for finals and just wanted some sort of spontaneity in my life, I was an acting focus in the Theatre & Dance department at UT and was feeling a bit jaded with it and wanted to find the joy in why I loved performing and entertaining people again, so I reserved the last spot in an SC winter intensive starting a week later and booked a flight to Chicago. Since then I’ve never stopped.

Kasey Borger

Kasey Borger

Kasey: I’ve been performing improv for a year. I had always wanted to do something with comedy but never really felt like I had a way to do that, other than stand up. Not that stand up isn’t cool, I just don’t have the balls to do it. A friend of mine suggested I do improv and I said “What’s that?” Once I finally signed up and started, I was hooked. In a level two class showcase the instructor said “Your job in this show is to make the other people on stage look like they are the funniest person in the world.” I loved that idea so much and wanted more.

Juliet Prather

Juliet Prather

Juliet: I’ve been doing the improv for about a year and a half. My journey with it started when I saw a show at UCB in New York that made me feel like there were people in this world that thought like me, except funnier and faster. Within probably 30 seconds, I knew I wanted to be a part it. I signed up officially probably 8 months later because improv is really scary. I love it, though, and I’m grateful everyday that we’re together.

Amy Wright

Amy Wright

Amy: I’ve been doing improv for about a year. I was first introduced to it through an acting program I did in Chicago while I was in high school and I totally fell in love. But it also took me a while to sign up, a couple years actually. I was scared and shy and just being a turkey about the whole thing. Then I met Juliet and we became friends and she was so head over heels in love with improv and she basically spent an entire summer convincing me to sign up for classes – I think she might be my Fairy Godmother. I can’t imagine my life without improv and all the people I’ve met through it.

How did Patio Talk come together?

Kasey: Other than Amy and Juliet, we all met at the theater. I think we became involved in projects together, saw each other play, and realized we all had the same very specific type of humor. We just wanted to collaborate and do something fun together and the cagematch is the perfect place for that. We were originally just going to do the cagematch but we had so much fun we wanted to do more! Our name is derived from the format we all came up with together — just a coupla broads talkin’ and drinkin’ on a patio.

Chrissy: I feel like my involvement came from Kasey and I just really wanting to get brunch together.

Juliet: In all honesty I just had a big girl crush on all of them at one point or another and made the decision to pursue. Geez they are all so funny.

Amy: I feel like we all sort of collected each other, like we scouted out the people who we wanted to play with the most.

Was it deliberate to form an all-female troupe?

Kasey: No, it was not deliberate.

Chrissy: We all liked how the others played and valued each others’ talents first. I think it was a secondary coincidental thing that we all happened to be female.

What spurred you all to create BettyFest?

BettyFestKasey: After a CageMatch show where Patio Talk played Control Match, someone approached us and said that the energy in the theater was different that night with all females playing. And it’s true. Not better, just different. We got to thinking about how many nights a week tend to be dominated by all male troupes, and we realized that we wanted to bring that different energy to the theater.

It also spurred from just wanting to showcase the amazing pool of talented women in the community. We talked about our biggest influences, or shows that kind of changed how we saw improv. For a lot of us it was seeing a woman (Erika May McNichol) on stage who didn’t stick to playing traditional female characters but who also didn’t shy away from it if the scene called for that. She just played and was funny and also happened to be female. My classes have been all males except for myself since level two. I ended up playing a lot of feminine characters and kind of felt like, well, this is what I can and should add. But, watching a woman play who played with the boys but didn’t stick out just for being a woman was really inspirational to me. I guess we just wanted a whole night where we could showcase that.

How do you get pumped up for a show?

Chrissy: Our character transformations get pretty rambunctious and then without
fail we end up singing in the lobby or in the parking lot right before we go on.

Kasey: Yes! Character transformation is Patio Talk’s jam. If it weren’t weird do to improv warm ups on stage, I think that would be a highly entertaining thing to watch Patio Talk heighten characters so far and so quickly with only four people. We also just try to connect, talk about our day, and maybe share some funny anecdotes.

Juliet: Same thing as everyone else, as well as just talk with each other.

Amy: Personally, I always try to force us to sing. I don’t know, it just works for me.

Best thing that’s happened during a show? Worst?

Chrissy: Best — one of the most fun moments was probably a series of scenes from one of our earlier shows (might have been our first) that included a family having a terrible Christmas, finding out it was because their father was Santa and then deciding to go and reconcile with their estranged father by having to wait in line and sit on Santa’s lap at the mall just to talk to him. Everyone just had such a well defined character and then all the characters got on the same page to do this thing together but never dropped their character stuff. Worst — most recently, I got gum in my hair during a “Bridgeport Correctional Facility Short Form Impromptu Skit Players” show.

Kasey: Best — realizing during the first Patio Talk show that this is something special. We were a CageMatch troupe who just wanted to do a show together because, why not? After our first show, however, we all couldn’t wait to do it again. I know it’s cheesy but there is almost this magical element when we play together that can’t really be described. It’s incredibly freeing.Worst — I think that every bad moment in improv is self inflicted. Improv lends itself to such a wonderful, supportive community who has your back no matter what. When I feel the worst is when I am being too hard on myself or judging too harshly and thus not being supportive. Improv, above all, is about having fun. It’s the worst when you suck the fun out of it for yourself.

Is there an official troupe drink?

Chrissy: If you asked Juliet she would say a “Martreuse Goose with Raspberry Gin” which is not a real drink. She can’t pronounce Moscow Mule.

Kasey: Long island ice teas!

Juliet: Both of those answers are true!

Favorite band. Bonus points if you name a song.

Chrissy: Bright Eyes. I can name almost all Bright Eyes songs, particularly the I’m Wide Awake It’s Morning album. That was my introduction to Mr. Oberst. My aim screename was WeMustStare326. LAME!

Amy: I have a Neutral Milk Hotel tattoo. My aim screenname was FunkyMonkey3013, which is not a reference to a song at all but is also lame.

Kasey: I like Jenny Lewis, I like Bright Eyes, I like Miley Cyrus, I like almost all Pop Punk, I like musicals– What I’m really saying is: this is TOO HARD. Also my first screen name was akachickenlips. It was a joke my dad made. Comedy runs in my blood.

It there a Patio Talk theme song?

Chrissy: Yes! You may have seen it in our Facebook videos. It goes: Patio, Patio, Patio Talk. P-P-P-Patio Talk, Patio Talk. And it basically just repeats that.

Favorite moment in comedy. Ever?

Chrissy: I have lots of favorites for many different reasons but I’ll boil it down to characters. I love great comedians who are also great actors and just go head first into the premise and their characters. For starters, the Vitameatavegamin Girl bit in I Love Lucy, “The Audition” sketch from Mr. Show, Maya Rudolph’s SNL sketch “Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Laughs,” Gilda Radner’s SNL Judy Miller Talk Show, Andy Daly in anything he does, Nathan Fielder, Tony Hale, the entire cast of Reno 911! Oh man, there’s so much more. I can’t keep going or else I won’t stop.

Amy: I like things that are so bad they’re good. See: The Room, Troll 2, Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace, and Liz Lemon’s phone sex commercial on 30 Rock. For whatever reason, that really just kills me. I think maybe because its so hard to do on purpose, so you either have to be really dumb or really smart to pull it off? Also you know what, anything on 30 Rock. These are such vague answers and I’m cheating but I don’t care. I’m obsessed with 30 Rock, its all gold. Also Molly Shannon fucking falling on top of those metal fold-up chairs as Mary Catherine Gallagher, oh my god.

Kasey: I guess I love when funny things happen when someone isn’t trying to be funny. I love when anyone breaks on SNL, I love when people use funny voices in real life, and I especially love when someone is genuinely honest about something they shouldn’t be in a reality show.

Juliet: I honestly do not have an answer. I can say though that my favorite performers are those like Will Ferrel and Amy Poehler who mesh great, devoted, character work with a class clown-level of goofiness. They do whatever they can to make sure that the people they’re playing with have fun, and I love to watch that.

Patio Talk the TV show. Discuss.

Kasey: Broad City meets 30 Rock meets Parks and Rec meets SNL meets Law and Order SVU meets Friday Night Lights meets Transformers the TV show meets the “Californians” bit from SNL meets home videos from when we were kids.

Chrissy: …meets Gilmore Girls season 3 meets Ahh! Real Monsters meets Scandal meets Clueless the TV show meets the KXAN News at 9 meets that episode of Friends, “The One Where No One’s Ready” meets Project Runway meets Amazing Race meets The Jamie Kennedy X-periment.

Amy: …meets YouTube videos of people falling down meets Mad Men meets the opening credits to Game of Thrones meets MTV’s Next meets Say Yes to the Dress meets General Hospital.

Kasey: … meets Degrassi.

Juliet: Sounds like a pretty fucking good time to me.

What would you say to someone who has thought about taking classes, but hasn’t pulled the trigger yet?

Kasey: I know everyone says this, but it will change your life. It will humble you, it will teach you to be supportive, it will free you, but most of all, it will be fun.

Chrissy: If you take an improv class you will have more fun. Then you will start asking yourself in all situations, however miniscule or monotonous, how can I have more fun right now? And that is a way more invigorating way to live. And then all of a sudden you love getting your oil changed because you’ve found the fun in sitting in that waiting room with the 3 day old USA Today’s and the vending machine filled with Grape Crush.

Juliet: It’s great and you’re great so just do it already

Amy: You’re wasting time!! Just get drunk and put money down on it so you can’t back out, that worked for me. You’ll only regret that you didn’t do it sooner.

Besides Patio Talk, who should people check out at ColdTowne Theater?

Chrissy: I always, without fail, love watching the CageMatch at 10PM on Wednesdays. I think there is such fun and fearless improv happening every week in that slot. There is better than watching other people love and have fun with each other on stage. That energy is infectious and the Cagematch feels like a high school pep rally but a pep rally that you would actually want to go too. Same with The Graduation shows.

Kasey: Every show, every night. I know this is another question I am cheating on, but there is so much amazing improv going on and you really don’t know when you’re going to catch an amazing new troupe or be inspired by an established one. It’s so essential to watch people who have a better, or even just different, grasp on improv than you.

Amy: The Frank Mills, Saturdays at 10!!!! Also check out the stupid good sketch shows that are happening all the time — Wink Planet shouldn’t be missed, go listen to all the commercials they did for the Got Your Back podcast RIGHT NOW! And Off The Wall is doing two cool shows that I want to see. They did a sketch about Nazi hunters that I saw during The People’s Sketch Show that made me cry.

Juliet: Friday night is always fun. Movie Riot at 7pm is one of the most fun group of players you can get to see, and Bad Boys are always super solid at 8:30. Also, I just saw the Bridgeport show last Saturday and it was amazing. Everyone should see that while they have a chance to (Saturdays in June at 8:30).

Favorite thing about improv?

Chrissy: The human brain is weird. I like hearing how weird we all our when we just let ourselves have fun in the moment.

Kasey: I guess when I think about answering this question, I think about my favorite thing about learning improv. I love the idea of supporting unconditionally. Going out on stage and believing that anything that comes out of anyone’s mouth is correct is so incredibly freeing and fun. You can’t fail when you play with someone who supports unconditionally and especially when you do the same. I also love to see grown adults act like goofballs.

Amy: I like shouting and climbing on top of people and I like when other people shout and climb on top of me — I love giving and also feeling the support that something like that requires.

Juliet: You can’t be good at improv unless you support, listen, and ultimately make other people look good. I love that. It sort of forces you to be a better person.


Be sure to check out BettyFest, Thursday at 8:30pm in June. Come early to enjoy Long Island Iced Teas with headlining troupe Patio Talk, stay late to enjoy cheap beers in the parking lot with headlining troupe Patio Talk.

6/26 Hosted by: Caroline Bassett With: Casscade (Cat Drago, Sarah Marie Curry) – Get Tickets

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The Return of the Bridgeport Women’s Correctional Facility Players!

Bridgeport Correctional Facility Short Form Impromptu Skit Players return to Austin in June at ColdTowne Theater, combining competitive short-form improvisation, ladies wrestling and 70’s exploitation films into a single, vulgar comedy experience.

Inspired by Jack Hill’s Switchblade Sisters, cult television show Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling (G.L.o.W.) and old-school roller derby, Bridgeport is female prisoners from a north Texas incarceration unit performing short-form improvisation.

The troupe returns to Austin after an 8 year break, last playing at the Out of Bounds festival in 2006.

“The show is persona-based improvisation, with the actors developing and portraying characters from a women’s prison. The characters they develop are passionate about the art form and do their best to deliver a competitive short form show. We had a blast with this show back in 2006, when it was first staged and this run features some of the original players, along with new players and characters for this run” says director and producer, Erika May McNichol. “”We endeavor to be true to the sources of Switchblade Sisters and G.L.O.W., especially; the show is physical, raunchy and of questionable taste.””

The characters of Bridgeport are portrayed by Katie Thornton, Chrissy Shackleford, Kaci Beeler, Rachel Madorsky, Courtney Hopkin, Cortnie Jones, Lisa Jackson and Erika May McNichol.

Bridgeport Correctional Facility Short Form Impromptu Skit Players runs at 8:30pm every Saturday in June, beginning June 7th and running through June 28th at ColdTowne Theater.

Listen to an interview with Erika May.

Get Tickets:
June 7th
June 14th
June 21st
June 28th

The Church of Indeterminate Divinity

As Austin improv’s John Ratliff puts it, he came to Improv through the backdoor as one of the original musical accompanists of Girls Girls Girls. He quickly fell in love with the art form and went all in, dedicating many (if not most) of his waking hours to performing and teaching improv.

John Ratliff is a member of one of the ColdTowne Conservatory’s very first graduating classes and performs regularly with Austin improv mainstays The Glamping Trip, Ratliff and Jackson, and Dervish. He’s perhaps best known as an improv educator, having won an Austin Chronicle critic’s pick for “Best Improv Teacher” as well as several nods from the ColdTowne community for “Best Improv Teacher/Coach.”

Ratliff has coached several improv groups, but he is making his directorial debut on Sunday, April 20th at 7pm with the The Church of Indeterminate Divinity. The show weaves together improv comedy, unconventional theater, and live musical accompaniment in a full-immersion experience unlike anything else. Part tent meeting, part house concert, and part flash mob, it’s church for people who don’t go to church: real as rent and funny as hell.

So why “Church?”

It was an idea that I’d been batting around in my head for a while, but for some reason this time I submitted it. I was literally falling asleep as I wrote the pitch, so my semi-conscious state might have influenced both the description and the decision to hit Send. When the schedule came out I was like, “Oh, shit, now I have to actually do this.”

How is this show going to be different from your typical improv experience?

That’s going to change over the course of the run; it’s definitely a work in progress. The first show is kind of an exoskeleton that the show will eventually burst and shatter once it develops its own muscles.

But I think even the first show will distinguish itself from typical improv by the fact that it expresses a point of view. I was trying to convey the philosophy of the show to the cast, and Kasey Borger finally said, “So it’s basically the Church of Improv,” which sums it up perfectly. There are parts of it that are sincere, which I know will send some people out the door like kerosened cats, but it’s a great cast so at its core it’s still a very funny improv show.

And of course it has music, which will become a much bigger part of it the longer we do it. If we were to get picked up for a longer run, my ultimate goal would be to assemble a group of killer musicians who can improvise along with the players, something like Todd Stashwick’s Mayfly shows, or if Array had worked with a live band, and then let that organic stuff flow in and out of the scenes and set pieces. I only had about a month to throw the first show together, so the music is still pretty basic and more separated from the rest of the show. So far it’s mostly just Justin Soileau and Ian Townsend and me ploinking around under the singing. But at least we’ve got that piece in place.

The whole thing will continue to evolve, and probably not at all like I think it will.

Where did the seeds of this idea come from?

Oh, man, so many places. Growing up, I was always completely opposed to organized religion. Then I started going to AA, and I was like, “Oh, so this is why people go to church.” The value of it wasn’t really in whether your beliefs match up with the other people’s, because in AA they emphatically do not. But there are important, practical things that happen in these communal spaces that have nothing to do with dogma or belief. And fun things. I once interviewed a duelling-piano-bar pianist who pointed out that piano bars and church are the only places where complete strangers sing together.

So to me the parallels to improv are glaringly obvious. It’s a situation where you have to let go of your ego to become part of something much bigger than yourself — but the reward is that you’re completely supported by everyone around you, so you know you can be more open and vulnerable than you could be out in the world, because no matter what happens, you’ll be taken care of. And if enough people do that together, you can create something that couldn’t possibly have existed outside of this space.

(But remember, everybody, this show is REALLY FUNNY.)

What continues to excite you about improv?

Seeing all these incredibly talented people who keep showing up at our theater. I can sometimes go to pretty dark places agonizing about my own improv and how I’m never gonna be as good as I want to be, but one great thing about getting older is that I can finally take unrestrained pleasure in other people being awesome without comparing myself to them. It’s not a zero-sum game. I went to see the CageMatch last night (Patio Talk vs. Control Match) and I was pretty much giddy with delight for the entire show, whereas when I was younger my one thought would have been “Shit, I’m never gonna be that good.”

But as I mentioned to Jericho after the last student auditions, I’m really glad I’m already grandfathered in.

I also think we’re just now starting to scratch the surface of what improv can do. I feel like someone in 1962 who loves rock music and who can’t possibly know about The Velvet Underground or My Bloody Valentine or PJ Harvey but who senses that amazing things are possible that nobody’s gotten to yet.

As a director, what do you look for when you’re casting someone in a show like this?

Because I didn’t have time for auditions, I wanted people that I knew could play together, so I basically approached Collective Alibi and asked if any of them wanted to do it, because I knew that any possible combination of that group would be great together. Some of them couldn’t do it, but some of them (at press time: Kasey Borger, Jake Millward, Steve Moore, Ian Townsend, Javier Ungo, and Amy Wright) are going to be with the show at various points during this four-month run, and our assistant director Chrissy Shackelford will also be playing.

But we’re going to be adding to the cast, so in answer to your question: I’m looking for improvisers who are willing to put the same amount of work into an improv show that you’d put into professional scripted theater, who can play emotionally believable scenes, and who are open to exploring less conventional stuff like organic work and abstract physicality. And who love improv so much that they love working hard to get better at it. I’ve pretty much had it with improvisers who don’t want to do anything they’re not already good at.

There, that should eliminate just about everybody. Whoever’s left, get in touch with me.

The impression I get is that you’re very passionate about teaching? What drew you to being an improv teacher?

I come from a long line of teachers and preachers, so it’s not surprising that I’d wind up doing one or the other (or now both, I guess). Before I discovered improv I went through yoga teacher training, so apparently some part of me desperately wanted to tell other people how to do things I couldn’t really do myself.

Not to be fucking pious about it, but I feel like teaching is currently the best way I can serve the art of improv. I’m always trying to be a better player, and if the Devil offered me infinite performance ability in exchange for all my teaching ability, I can’t say I wouldn’t be tempted, but teaching is something I can contribute that seems to be useful to people, and that’s a privilege, really.

I know I get too wrapped up in it sometimes. When I feel like I did a bad job teaching or coaching it pretty much destroys me for the rest of the night.

But to tie all this together (and give you one more answer to an earlier question): I was teaching a class at another theater once and we were doing a bunch of organic stuff and this one student absolutely refused to participate. Worse, she wanted to argue about it. So after class we were talking and I was telling her that she had to commit even though it was uncomfortable, and she kept arguing, and I kept insisting, and finally she asked, “What do you care what I do in class?” and I just reared back and bellowed, “BECAUSE THIS IS MY CHURCH, AND YOU’RE SHITTING IN IT!”

7pm the third Sunday of every month, everybody! Pay what you want! And it’ll be funny, I promise!

Sketch Comedy, Thursdays in April!

Nice Astronaut Presents: “Back in Townsville: The Community Center.”

Here we are at Townsville’s local Community Center. Every stripe of citizen has some reason to be here, from the lowly boyscout to the towering politician. Take classes with experienced professionals, or watch lively performances. Visit the spacious library, the state-of-the-art exercise room, or the Olympic-size swimming pool. Just, whatever you do, if you see a pregnant lady pull out a knife, run away.

One of ColdTowne’s longest running improv troupes, Nice Astronaut, has built a closed-quarters sketch show detailing one afternoon at this Community Center. In the fictional small Texas town known as Townsville, folks carry a wide range of beliefs. Mr. Mayor himself has forsworn the normal municipal budget, insisting on his own odd bartering system. Local theater guru Sensei Doug believes that all the world’s a stage, even when you’re being mugged. Some citizens want to openly carry their large firearms in all public spaces. Others not so much. Developed in part from improv work, this show’s rapid pace will keep you watching as characters move through the space of the community center. From one scene to the next, their conflicts and agendas will intertwine, building to a surprise announcement.

Directed by Chris McKeever, a performer/director from the Upright Citizen’s Brigade Theater in New York City.

Nice Astronaut has performed at NYC’s Del Close Marathon, the Chicago Improv Festival, and Austin’s Out of Bounds Comedy Festival. They’ve taught and performed in Austin, Houston, and Pheonix. When they have the time, they sip homebrewed beer and play rare games of chance. Their late-night karaoke improv show, Improvaoke, runs once a month at ColdTowne Theater. Nice Astronauts currently include: Tim Honker, Nicole McCracken, Drew Wesley, Nathan Sowell, Joseph Dailey, Calan Lambert, and Chaz Formichella.

Oh, and you’ll be happy to see the amazing additional cast members for this show: Katie Thornton (of Braised in Texas), Arian Brumby (of What’s the Story Steve), and Brett Tribe (of Bad Boys).

Thursdays in April and Saturdays in May, 8:30pm at ColdTowne Theater!